Archive for November, 2012

USA the latest nation to receive the spaceship program

Posted in Uncategorized on November 24, 2012 by betweentwopines

 

We are proud to announce that today 15.11.2012 the Nation of United States of America has received the USB stick containing all patents and blueprints of nuclear reactor plasma spaceship technology of the Keshe Foundation.

We welcome our American brothers in the family of the Keshe Foundations’ spaceship program and surely we will reach new horizons with the addition of American government and NASA to our family.

Note

Following My letter offering as a gift the spaceship program to the ambassador of USA in Belgium in late October, on the 6.11.2012 at 3.45 pm I was in receipt of an e-mail in response to this friendly offer from the USA embassy in Brussels.

The content of the e-mail from the embassy confirmed that USA is ready to accept the gift of the nuclear reactor plasma spaceship technology of the Keshe Foundation and in return e-mails immediately the date was agreed as was suggested by the embassy.

Today 15.11.2012 at 3pm at the appointed place the Director of the Keshe Foundation and the senior officer of the US embassy met in a friendly and cordially manner and the spaceship technology USB stick was handed over to the government of United States of America.

We have offered the US and NASA our full support for their development and deployment of this technology.

With this meeting and exchange of nuclear technology we hope to bring to an end the lasting apparent animosity between the two nations.

We shall build on this progress to bring peace into space for all nations.

I, as the Director of the Keshe Foundation and an Iranian nuclear scientist, would like to thank His Excellency president Obama for ordering such a move by his embassy.

In our meeting we have reached and extended the hand of peace from our side to His nation and I hope this will be reciprocated the same by his Excellency president Obama, now that borders have become meaningless with deployment of this new spaceship program and technology.

I thank the American ambassador His Excellency Mr. Gutman for this most gracious move and I am sure the first steps towards peace between two nations as is the wish of Iran has come to take shape.

With Kindest regards to all men of peace

M T Keshe
The Director of the Keshe Foundation

 

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Stop the ITU Taking Over the Internet, Warns the European Parliament

Posted in Uncategorized on November 23, 2012 by betweentwopines

Parliamentarians call for ITU moves to be blocked at WCIT next month

By Jennifer Baker

Thu, November 22, 2012

IDG News Service (Brussels Bureau) — Control of the Internet must be stopped from falling into the hands of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), the European Parliament has warned.

The European Union’s elected representatives loudly called for negotiators to block attempts by the ITU to gain ultimate control over the Internet at a conference in Dubai next month.

The World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT) will attempt to revise international telecommunication regulations, which have not been updated since 1988. A resolution approved by an overwhelming majority of Members of the European Parliament on Thursday warned that some of the proposals presented ahead of WCIT could result in the ITU itself becoming “the ruling power of the Internet,” something the parliament is determined to prevent.

“The ITU, or any other single international institution, is not the appropriate body to assert regulatory authority over the Internet,” said the resolution, drawn up by Dutch parliamentarian Marietje Schaake.

The resolution calls on the E.U. member states to prevent any changes to the International Telecommunication Regulations that would be harmful to the openness of the Internet, net neutrality and freedom of expression.

The ITU is the United Nations industry body for telecommunications operators. Its original brief was to allocate global radio spectrum and satellite orbits, and to develop technical interoperability standards for telecommunication networks. However, the Internet as we know it did not exist when the international telecommunication regulations (ITRs) were drawn up.

All 27 member states of the E.U. are signatories of these ITRs and as a result can negotiate as a bloc. The parliament’s resolution calls on the Council and Commission, which will represent the E.U. in Dubai, to ensure that any changes to the ITRs “will further the E.U.’s objectives and interests to advance the Internet as a public place, where human rights and fundamental freedoms, particularly freedom of expression and assembly, are respected, as well as free market principles, net neutrality and entrepreneurship are ensured”.

The Parliament also said that it is concerned that some of the ITU reform proposals would set up charging mechanisms, which could seriously threaten the open and competitive nature of the Internet by driving up prices and hurting innovation.

Meanwhile search giant Google has invited users to “pledge your support for the free and open Internet,” warning that governments working behind closed doors in Dubai should not direct its future.

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ATS Forum

Paralyzed dogs walk again with cell injections

Posted in Uncategorized on November 20, 2012 by betweentwopines

Cells grown from the nasal passages of healthy dogs restored injured pups

CBC News

Posted: Nov 20, 2012

 

Paralyzed dogs in a U.K. study have been restored to mobility thanks to injected cells, letting Cambridge University scientists dare to hope that the technique could eventually aid the treatment of humans.

In experiments done by the U.K. Medical Research Council’s Regenerative Medicine Centre and Cambridge University’s Veterinary School, 23 hobbled dogs who had suffered spinal injuries were injected with cells grown from the nasal passages of healthy dogs. The cells were injected into their spines.

A neutral control substance was injected into 11 other injured dogs. No improvement occurred in the control group, but many of the 23 cell transplant dogs were able to walk again on a treadmill with the help of a harness.

“Our findings are extremely exciting, because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement,” the BBC quoted Prof. Robin Franklin, a regeneration biologist at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Stem Cell Institute and report co-author, as saying.

“We’re confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries, but that’s a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function.”

The results were published in the November issue of the neurology journal Brain.

According to the BBC, researchers say the transplanted cells regenerated nerve fibres across the damaged region of the spinal cord, allowing the dogs to regain use of their back legs and co-ordinate front-leg movement.

However, the restored nerve fibres only stretched over short distances, which calls into question the applicability in humans.

“This is not a cure for spinal cord injury in humans — that could still be a long way off,” Prof. Geoffrey Raisman, chair of Neural Regeneration at University College London, told the BBC. “But this is the most encouraging advance for some years and is a significant step on the road towards it.”

 

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New nanoparticle halts multiple sclerosis, now being tested in Type 1 diabetes and asthma

Posted in Uncategorized on November 19, 2012 by betweentwopines

 

November 18, 2012

In a breakthrough for nanotechnology and multiple sclerosis, a biodegradable nanoparticle turns out to be the perfect vehicle to stealthily deliver an antigen that tricks the immune system into stopping its attack on myelin and halt a model of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice, according to new Northwestern Medicine research.

The new nanotechnology also can be applied to a variety of immune-mediated diseases including Type 1 diabetes, food allergies and airway allergies such as asthma. In MS, the immune system attacks the myelin membrane that insulates nerves cells in the brain, spinal cord and optic nerve. When the insulation is destroyed, electrical signals can’t be effectively conducted, resulting in symptoms that range from mild limb numbness to paralysis or blindness. About 80 percent of MS patients are diagnosed with the relapsing remitting form of the disease. The Northwestern nanotechnology does not suppress the entire immune system as do current therapies for MS, which make patients more susceptible to everyday infections and higher rates of cancer. Rather, when the nanoparticles are attached to myelin antigens and injected into the mice, the immune system is reset to normal. The immune system stops recognizing myelin as an alien invader and halts its attack on it. “This is a highly significant breakthrough in translational immunotherapy,” said Stephen Miller, a corresponding author of the study and the Judy Gugenheim Research Professor of Microbiology-Immunology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “The beauty of this new technology is it can be used in many immune-related diseases. We simply change the antigen that’s delivered.” “The holy grail is to develop a therapy that is specific to the pathological immune response, in this case the body attacking myelin,” Miller added. “Our approach resets the immune system so it no longer attacks myelin but leaves the function of the normal immune system intact.”

The nanoparticle, made from an easily produced and already FDA-approved substance, was developed by Lonnie Shea, professor of chemical and biological engineering at Northwestern’s McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science. “This is a major breakthrough in nanotechnology, showing you can use it to regulate the immune system,” said Shea, also a corresponding author. The paper will be published Nov. 18 in the journal Nature Biotechnology. Miller and Shea are also members of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. In addition, Shea is a member of the Institute for BioNanotechnology in Medicine and the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute. CLINICAL TRIAL FOR MS TESTS SAME APPROACH—WITH KEY DIFFERENCE The study’s method is the same approach now being tested in multiple sclerosis patients in a phase I/II clinical trial—with one key difference. The trial uses a patient’s own white blood cells—a costly and labor intensive procedure—to deliver the antigen. The purpose of the new study was to see if nanoparticles could be as effective as the white blood cells as delivery vehicles. They were. THE BIG NANOPARTICLE ADVANTAGE FOR IMMUNOTHERAPY Nanoparticles have many advantages; they can be readily produced in a laboratory and standardized for manufacturing. They would make the potential therapy cheaper and more accessible to a general population. In addition, these nanoparticles are made of a polymer called Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), which consists of lactic acid and glycolic acid, both natural metabolites in the human body. PLG is most commonly used for biodegradable sutures. The fact that PLG is already FDA approved for other applications should facilitate translating the research to patients, Shea noted. Miller and Shea tested nanoparticles of various sizes and discovered that 500 nanometers was most effective at modulating the immune response. “We administered these particles to animals who have a disease very similar to relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis and stopped it in its tracks,” Miller said. “We prevented any future relapses for up to 100 days, which is the equivalent of several years in the life of an MS patient.” Shea and Miller also are currently testing the nanoparticles to treat Type one diabetes and airway diseases such as asthma. NANOPARTICLES FOOL IMMUNE SYSTEM In the study, researchers attached myelin antigens to the nanoparticles and injected them intravenously into the mice. The particles entered the spleen, which filters the blood and helps the body dispose of aging and dying blood cells. There, the particles were engulfed by macrophages, a type of immune cell, which then displayed the antigens on their cell surface. The immune system viewed the nanoparticles as ordinary dying blood cells and nothing to be concerned about. This created immune tolerance to the antigen by directly inhibiting the activity of myelin responsive T cells and by increasing the numbers of regulatory T cells which further calmed the autoimmune response. “The key here is that this antigen/particle-based approach to induction of tolerance is selective and targeted. Unlike generalized immunosuppression, which is the current therapy used for autoimmune diseases, this new process does not shut down the whole immune system,” said Christine Kelley, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering director of the division of Discovery Science and Technology at the National Institutes of Health, which supported the research. “This collaborative effort between expertise in immunology and bioengineering is a terrific example of the tremendous advances that can be made with scientifically convergent approaches to biomedical problems.” “We are proud to share our expertise in therapeutics development with Dr. Stephen Miller’s stellar team of academic scientists,” said Scott Johnson, CEO, president and founder of the Myelin Repair Foundation. “The idea to couple antigens to nanoparticles was conceived in discussions between Dr. Miller’s laboratory, the Myelin Repair Foundation’s drug discovery advisory board and Dr. Michael Pleiss, a member of the Myelin Repair Foundation’s internal research team, and we combined our efforts to focus on patient-oriented, clinically relevant research with broad implications for all autoimmune diseases. Our unique research model is designed to foster and extract the innovation from the academic science that we fund and transition these technologies to commercialization. The overarching goal is to ensure this important therapeutic pathway has its best chance to reach patients, with MS and all autoimmune diseases.” More information: Microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides induce T-cell tolerance and ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Nature Biotechnology (2012) doi:10.1038/nbt.2434, http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nbt.2434.html Journal reference: Nature Biotechnology Provided by Northwestern University

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-11-nanoparticle-halts-multiple-sclerosis-diabetes.html#jCp

Congressman Ron Paul’s Farewell Speech to Congress

Posted in Politics on November 15, 2012 by betweentwopines

 

Beta blockers are busted – what happens next?

Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2012 by betweentwopines

12 November 2012 by Josh Bloom

 

They have treated heart disease for 40 years, but it now seems that beta blockers don’t work. What went wrong?

IT IS very rare for new evidence to question or even negate the utility of a well-established class of drugs. But after four decades as a standard therapy for heart disease and high blood pressure, it looks like this fate will befall beta blockers. Two major studies published within about a week of each other suggest that the drugs do not work for these conditions. This is a big surprise, with big implications.

The first beta blocker, Inderal, was launched in 1964 by Imperial Chemical Industries for treatment of angina. This drug has been hailed as one of great medical advances of the 20th century. Its inventor, James Black, was awarded the Nobel prize in medicine in 1988.

The 20 or so beta blockers now on the market are very widely used – almost 200 million prescriptions were written for them in the US in 2010. They are standard issue for most people with heart disease or high blood pressure. This may now change.

A large study published last month in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that beta blockers did not prolong the lives of patients – a revelation that must have left many cardiologists shaking their heads (JAMA, vol 308, p 1340).

The researchers followed almost 45,000 heart patients over three-and-a-half years and found that beta blockers did not reduce the risk of heart attacks, deaths from heart attacks, or stroke.

While this is not definitive, it’s pretty damning, especially when another study – published just days earlier – found pretty much the same thing (Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol 60, p 1854).

The goal of this second study was to examine the effect of drug compliance on death rates in patients who had had heart attacks. About half of patients complied with their drug regimen. Unsurprisingly, these people were nearly 30 per cent less likely to die than those who did not comply.

This was to be expected, but there was one big surprise. While the result held for the standard classes of heart drugs – statins, anticoagulants and antihypertensives – it did not for beta blockers. Regardless of whether or not patients stuck to their regimen, their risk of dying was the same. Taken together with the JAMA study, it becomes very reasonable to question the benefit of beta blockers for treating these conditions.

To understand what is going on, consider how they work. Like many drugs, beta blockers target receptors embedded in the surface of cells. Receptors are “molecular switches” – when a specific molecule binds to them, they change shape and send a signal to the cell to perform a certain function. Beta blockers target beta receptors, which respond to the “fight or flight” hormones adrenalin and noradrenalin.

In humans, there are two principle types of beta-receptor – beta-1, primarily found in the heart, and beta-2, located at multiple sites, including the smooth-muscle cells of the bronchial tubes and in veins.

When adrenalin and noradrenalin bind to beta-1 receptors, they signal the heart to beat faster and pump harder. Binding to beta-2 receptors causes smooth muscle relaxation, especially in the airways, explaining why beta-2 activators are used as asthma drugs.

Beta blockers bind to both types of receptor, but do not activate the cellular response. This blocks adrenalin and noradrenalin from reaching their target and activating the response. By preventing the normal hormone-receptor interaction, the beta blockers slow the heart and cause it to pump less forcefully, lowering blood pressure.

The premise of beta-blocker therapy has been that giving the heart a rest will diminish the frequency of heart attacks. In the light of the two new studies, it is clearly time to question this.

Which raises the question: why has it taken so long to find out? It is worth noting at this point that this is not yet another case of a drug entering the market only to be withdrawn later because of lack of efficacy or even adverse reactions which could have been noticed with longer or larger trials. It is simply a new medical revelation. The authors of the JAMA paper provide a reasonable explanation of the conflict between their results and earlier studies.

The key word is “earlier”. Most clinical trials on beta blockers took place before reperfusion therapy became standard treatment following heart attacks. Reperfusion involves opening the blocked artery by surgery or pharmaceuticals, and has been shown to significantly reduce damage to the heart.

Damaged hearts are more prone to fatal irregular beats, and beta blockers are useful in controlling this. But with the advent of reperfusion therapy, people who survived heart attacks suffered less cardiac damage, so the frequency of fatal arrhythmias was lower. Put simply, the beta blocker effect was significant before the advent of this improved treatment, but the beneficial effect has since disappeared.

Additionally, newer and better drugs such as anticoagulants, statins and antihypertensives are now routinely used in heart disease. These more effective therapies swamp any smaller benefit that the beta blockers might provide, minimising any measurable effect.

What comes next is impossible to predict, but we may well be seeing a rare case of medical wisdom being overturned almost overnight. Beta blockers are not dangerous and have been in use for such a long time that it is unlikely that we will see an immediate cessation. But these results are hard to ignore, and cardiologists will be paying careful attention.

 

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New Mayan Calendar Discovered That Doesn’t End in 2012

Posted in Uncategorized on November 14, 2012 by betweentwopines

DASHIELL BENNETT  MAY 10, 2012

Archeologists have unearthed what they say is the oldest known version of the Mayan calendar and one that doesn’t “end” with the Earth’s destruction later this year. Yeah, you’re welcome.

According to The Washington Post‘s Brian Vastag, researchers excavating the “lost” city of Xultún in present-day Guatemala discovered new astronomical tables carved into the wall of a “1200-year-old residential building.” Much like the Maya codices that conspiracy theorists say predict an end-of-the-world date in December 2012, the tables chart planetary movements, moon and star patterns, and can predict the positions of celestial bodies thousands of years into the past and the future.

Numerous doomsday predictions are based on the claim that previously known codieces, like the famous Dresden Codex, chart the entire length of human history, but mysteriously stop on December 21, 2012 as if the Mayans knew that would be the last day humans would be around. However, the archeologists say that these the newly discovered tables — which pre-date the oldest known codex by as much as 500 years — span over 7,000 years of time, stretching far beyond of present age. So, you can breathe a little easier, though the news will come as a big shock to the tourism industry in Belize and other “entreprenuers” who are willing to take all your money off your hands before the big one hits.

If you still need something to panic about, Tulane University’s Marc Zender, who led the expedition, says that the Mayan calendar still begins a new “long cycle” in 2012, but compares he compares to an “odometer on a car rolling over from 99,999 miles to zero: “You go, ‘Yay,’ but the car just doesn’t disappear.” Oh, really? Well, we’ll see about that.

 

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